Weather: A cool 30 degrees

PAX: 4 Pax came out for the block party Zoolander (Q), Coyote, FNG Hunter and FNG Robert

Disclaimer and Core Principles

Warm Ups: Imperial Walkers 25IC, Arm Circles 12 forward/12 backward IC, Weed Pickers 12 IC,

Beat Down: The Q will lead the Pax on a trip around the World ( quarter mile track around the field at Grizzly) and teach them about Christmas in different countries. The Pax will zamparini hold or goblet hold their blocks from country to country.

Mexico:

  • In Mexico, Christmas is celebrated from December 12th to January 6th.
  • From December 16th to Christmas Eve, children often perform the ‘Posada’ processions or Posadas. Posada is Spanish for Inn or Lodging. There are nine Posadas. These celebrate the part of the Christmas story where Joseph and Mary looked for somewhere to stay. For the Posadas, the outside of houses are decorated with evergreens, moss and paper lanterns.
  • In each Posada, children are given candles and a board, with painted clay figures of Mary riding on a donkey and Joseph, to process round the streets with. They call at the houses of friends and neighbors and sing a song at each home. The song they sing is about Joseph and Mary asking for a room in the house. But the children are told that there is no room in the house and that they must go away. Eventually they are told there is room and are welcomed in! When the children go into the house they say prayers of thanks and then they have a party with food, games and fireworks.
  • Each night a different house holds the Posada party. At the final Posada, on Christmas Eve, a manger and figures of shepherds are put on to the board. When the Posada house has been found, a baby Jesus is put into the manger and then families go to a midnight Church service. After the Church service there are more fireworks to celebrate the start of Christmas.

9 Block Merkins in honor of the 9 Posadas

Brazil

  • In Brazil, Santa Claus is called Papai Noel & Bom Velhinho (Good Old Man).
  • Many Christmas customs are similar to ones in the USA or UK even though it’s summer and very hot at Christmas time in Brazil. Many people like to go to the beach.
  • Sometimes children leave a sock near a window. If Papai Noel finds your sock, he’ll exchange it for a present!
  • It’s common in Brazil to get a ’13th salary’ at the end of the year – i.e. in December you get twice the normal amount of pay for that month! The idea is to help boost the economy around Christmas. 

13 Squats

Kenya

  • In Kenya, Christmas is a time when families try and be with one another. Many people travel from cities, back to the villages where the main part of their family might live. (Although there are more whole big families now living in cities so they don’t have to travel!) This is often the only time large families will see each other all year, so it is very important.
  • In cities and large towns, stores can have fake snow outside them! And there might be a Santa in the stores as well.
  • In Kenya, Santa doesn’t arrive with his Reindeer but might well come by Land-rover, Camel or even a bike!
  • Many people, especially Christians, will go to a Midnight Church Service to celebrate Christmas. The service will have Christmas hymns, carols & songs; and often nativity plays (showing the Christmas Story), poems & dances.

25 Over-head presses

India:

  • Compared to other religious festivals, Christmas is quite a small festival in India, due to the number of people who are Christians (about 2.3%) compared to people who belong to other religions. Having said this, the population of India is over 1 Billion, so there are over 25 million Christians in India!
  • One of the largest Indian Christian Communities in a city is in Mumbai. A lot of the Christians in Mumbai (previously known as Bombay) are Roman Catholics. In India’s smallest state, Goa which is on the west of India, about 26% of people are Christians. Many of the Christians in Mumbai came from or have roots in Goa. The states of Manipur, Meghalaya, Nagaland and Mizoram (all on the very east of India) have high populations of Christians as well.
  • Midnight mass is a very important service for Christians in India, especially Catholics. The whole family will walk to the mass and this will be followed by a massive feast of different delicacies, (mostly curries) and the giving and receiving of presents. Churches in India are decorated with Poinsettia flowers and candles for the Christmas Eve Midnight Mass service.

25 lunges towards the next destination

Japan:

  • In Japan, Christmas in known as more of a time to spread happiness rather than a religious celebration. Christmas Eve is often celebrated more than Christmas Day. Christmas Eve is thought of as a romantic day, in which couples spend together and exchange presents. In many ways it resembles Valentine’s Day celebrations. Young couples like to go for walks to look at the Christmas lights and have a romantic meal in a restaurant – booking a table on Christmas Eve can be very difficult as it’s so popular! Fried chicken is often eaten on Christmas day. It is the busiest time of year for restaurants such as KFC and people can place orders at their local fast food restaurant in advance! There was an advertising campaign by KFC in the 1974 called ‘Kentucky for Christmas!’ (Kurisumasu ni wa kentakkii!) which was very successful and made KFC popular for Christmas!

25 Curls

Russia:

  • In the days of the Soviet Union, Christmas was not celebrated very much. New Year was made into the important time. Following the revolution in 1917, Christmas was banned as a religious holiday in 1929 and Christmas Trees were banned until 1935 when they turned into ‘New Year’ Trees! If people did want to celebrate Christmas, they had to do it in secret just in their families. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, people were free to celebrate Christmas again. But it’s still a quieter and smaller holiday in Russia after the big New Year celebrations. New Year is also when ‘Grandfather Frost’ brings presents to children. Christmas in Russia is normally celebrated on January 7th (only a few Catholics might celebrate it on the 25th December). The date is different because the Russian Orthodox Church uses the old ‘Julian’ calendar for religious celebration days. The Orthodox Church also celebrates Advent. But it has fixed dates, starting on 28th November and going to the 6th January, so it’s 40 days long.

40 block dips

Germany

  • A big part of the Christmas celebrations in Germany is Advent. Several different types of Advent calendars are used in German homes. As well as the traditional one made of card that are used in many countries, there are ones made out of a wreath of Fir tree branches with 24 decorated boxes or bags hanging from it. Each box or bag has a little present in it. Another type is called a ‘Advent Kranz’ and is a ring of fir branches that has four candles on it. This is like the Advent candles that are sometimes used in Churches. One candle is lit at the beginning of each week in Advent.
  • Christmas Trees are very important in Germany. They were first used in Germany during the late Middle Ages. If there are young children in the house, the trees are usually secretly decorated by the mother of the family. The Christmas tree was traditionally brought into the house on Christmas Eve. In some parts of Germany, during the evening, the family would read the Bible and sing Christmas songs such as O Tannenbaum, Ihr Kinderlein Kommet and Stille Nacht (Slient Night).
  • Christmas Eve is the main day when Germans exchange presents with their families.
  • Germany is well known for its Christmas Markets where all sorts of Christmas foods and decorations are sold. Perhaps the most famous German decorations are glass ornaments. The glass ornaments were originally hand blown glass and were imported in the USA in 1880s by the Woolworth stores. The legend of the glass ‘Christmas Pickle‘ is famous in the USA, but it’s that, a legend. Most people in Germany have never heard of the Christmas Pickle!

25 Pickle Pounders

Mary: Back ‘home” in the USA

American Hammers: 12 IC, Tuck Crunches 12 IC, Boat Sit with OH Press 10 IC

Recover Recover

COT- Prayer requests were asked for Coyote’s coworkers who lost grandparents this week to COVID, Robert’s mother-in-law is battling Breast Cancer, Zoolander also has a coworker who’s daughter-in-law(21) has been diagnosed with Breast Cancer.

Moleskin- the fat and lazy side of me has really been working on my psyche and trying to find a way to NOT Q on Monday’s and take a break. However, I have gotten some new wind in my sails by Coyote leading the charge and getting some new EH’s to the beat downs. So many props to the running maniac himself Coyote!!!

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